Create a report

Create a report

Use report information to help improve your campaign relevance and the conversion rates for your ads. Here’s how you create a new report and schedule regular reports to be emailed to you.

The Bing Ads Reports page provides several standard reports to help you improve your campaign performance.

The following are some important reports that you should consider looking at to improve the relevance and freshness of your campaigns and the visibility, click-through rate, and conversion rates for your ads.

  • The Keyword, Campaign, Ad and Ad group reports tell you which campaigns are performing well and how your keywords are contributing to campaign performance.
  • The Search term report shows you which keywords cause your ads to display.
  • The Share of voice report gives you an estimate on where you are losing to competitors in the marketplace.
Notes
  • We don't include entities (campaigns, ad groups, keywords, etc.) that have zero impressions in our reports.
  • Reporting data is kept for specified periods of time. If you want to learn how far back hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, yearly and summary aggregated data can be retrieved for a report, see this MSDN article.
Learn the benefits of each type of report expando image

There are many different reports to choose from. Here is a description of each to help you choose:

Account
What it shows: The impressions, impression share (%), clicks, spend, and average cost-per-click for individual accounts. This data can be sorted by individual accounts, currency, bid match type, and delivered match type. Why run it: To observe long-term Bing Ads account performance and trends.
Campaign
What it shows: The impressions, impression share (%), clicks, spend, and average cost-per-click for each campaign or account. This data can be sorted by campaign, campaign status, and quality score. Why run it: To view high-level performance statistics and quality attributes for each campaign or account. This is also a quick way to flag any major campaign or account problems.
Ad group
What it shows: The impressions, impression share (%), clicks, spend, and average cost-per-click of your ad groups. This data can be sorted by ad group, ad group status, language, and network. Why run it: To more broadly compare delivery performance statistics by ad group, campaign, or account attributes rather than at the keyword level.
Ad
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, spend, and average cost-per-click for each ad. This data can be sorted by ad ID, ad status, ad title(s), display URL, and destination URL. Why run it: To help you determine which ads lead to clicks and conversions, and which are not performing. Having underperforming ads in your account can pull down the quality of your campaigns.
Keyword
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, click-through rate, quality score, bid, cost-per-click, position, and conversions for each individual keyword within your campaign. Why run it: To find out which keywords are triggering your ads and getting clicks. You can also identify keywords that aren’t performing well to determine if you want to delete them.
Search term
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, and click-through rate based on the search terms that have triggered your ads. Why run it: To get insight into what your audience is searching for when your ads are shown as well as ensure that your product titles are relevant to search queries.
Share of voice
What it shows: The impressions, impression share (%), impression share lost to budget (%), and impression share lost to bid. This data can be sorted by keyword, keyword ID, landing page experience, and quality score. Why run it: To view impression share (%) of successful bids for each keyword, and identify opportunities to increase impression share.
Destination URL
What it shows:The impressions, clicks, spend, and average cost-per-click for your landing pages. This data can be sorted by destination URL, account, campaign, and ad group. Note that only the first URL in the list (ad, keyword, or criterion) is reported. Why run it: To identify landing pages that met audience expectations, resulting in high click or conversion ratios.
Website URL (publisher)
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, spend, and conversions for websites on the Bing Network and syndicated search partner networks. This data can be sorted by website URL, account, campaign, and ad group. Why run it: To see if any website URLs aren’t performing well enough for your campaign or ad group target settings. For example, if ad impressions at those URLs yield a low click-through-rate, then you might decide to exclude those websites from your campaign.
Ad dynamic text
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, spend, and average cost-per-click of your dynamic text strings. This data can be sorted by ad title, destination URL, param 1, param 2, and param 3. Why run it: To identify which dynamic text strings are performing well and which strings you should consider changing.
Rich ad component
What it shows: The component clicks and component click-through rate of your rich ads. This data can be sorted by rich ad subtype, ad title, and component. Why run it: To view delivery performance of your Rich Ads in Search (RAIS) campaigns.
Audiences
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, revenue, and conversions for your audiences. Why run it: To evaluate performance of remarketing campaigns.
Goals
What it shows: The spend, revenue, assists, conversions, and conversion steps of your websites. This data can be sorted by account, ad group, campaign, keyword, and goal. Why run it: To discover whether visitors who arrive at your website via an Ad click, complete the steps on conversion pages of your website. This report provides data for all of your conversions’ goals including UET tags, App Install Ads, offline conversions, and historical campaign data.
Conversions
What it shows: The conversions, assists, revenue, and revenue per conversion for your campaigns. This data can be sorted by account, ad group, campaign, keyword, and device type. Why run it: To understand which campaigns and keywords are leading customers to complete conversion actions. This report provides data for all of your conversions’ goals including UET tags, App Install Ads, offline conversions, and historical campaign data.
Ad extension by keyword
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, spend, and average cost-per-click of your extensions for each keyword. This data can be sorted by keyword, keyword ID, ad extension type, and ad extension version. Why run it: To compare how well different versions of your ad extensions are performing for each keyword.
Ad extension by ad
What it shows: The aggregated extension impressions, clicks, spend, and average cost-per-click by ad. This data can be sorted by ad ID, ad title, ad extension type, and ad extension version. Why run it: To compare how well different versions of your ad extensions are performing with each ad.
Ad extension details
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, spend, and average cost-per-click of individual extension items. This data can be sorted by the individual ad extension property value, ad extension ID, and ad extension type. Why run it: To discover the effectiveness of individual ad extension items, for example, each link of a sitelink extension.
Call forwarding detail
What it shows: Duration for each forwarded call that originated from a call ad extension. Why run it: To discover which accounts, campaigns, or ad groups are driving the most completed phone calls.
Product partition
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, spend, average cost-per-click and conversion for each product group in your Shopping Campaigns. Why run it: To see the performance data for the product groups in your shopping campaigns and to optimize your campaigns accordingly.
Product partition unit
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, spend, average cost-per-click, and conversions for each product group in your Shopping Campaigns. Depending on the report time and columns you choose, the report may include more than one row per product group. Why run it: To see product partition unit data of your Product Groups in Shopping Campaigns.
Product dimension
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, spend, average cost-per-click and conversion for each product in your catalog [each line item in Bing Merchant Center catalog]. Why run it: To figure out which of your products are triggering ads and getting most clicks and optimize the ones not performing so well.
Change history
What it shows: A record of changes made to a particular account, including keyword bid changes, landing page changes, new campaign creations, or when new account budgets are added to the account. Why run it: To discover when changes to an account were made, as well as which user made the changes.
Age and gender
What it shows: The impression rate (%) and click-through-rate (%) for each campaign or ad group, organized by gender and age group. Why run it: To discover how your campaigns and ad groups are resonating with audiences of diverse age and gender.
User location
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, spend, and average cost-per-click for each ad group, organized by city, country, metro area, radius, state, and account. Why run it: To see which locations your traffic is coming from. You can then validate whether your location targeting strategy is successful, and identify opportunities to improve.
Geographic
What it shows: The impressions, clicks, spend, and average cost-per-click for each ad group, organized into columns that show the location used to serve ads. The location can be where the customers were physically located (location type is physical location) or the location that customers showed interest in (location type is location of interest.) Why run it: To see which locations your traffic is coming from. You can then validate whether your location targeting strategy is successful, and identify opportunities to improve.
Negative keyword conflicts
What it shows: Negative keywords that conflict with some of your keywords, and block your ad from showing. Why run it: This report tells you which keywords and negative keywords are in conflict, and whether the conflict is at the campaign or ad group level. Use this list to figure out which negative keywords to delete.
Traffic sources
What it shows: The revenue, assists, conversions, and conversion steps of your website traffic. This data can be sorted by source of your traffic, account, and goal. Why run it: To see which advertising publisher sources bring the most traffic to your website. This report is only available if you use Bing Ads Campaign Analytics.
Tactics and channels
What it shows: The number of times that users reach the different stages of a conversion funnel, broken out by advertising tactic and channel. Why run it: To understand how people interact with your website through the conversion process. You can use this report to get information about which tactic and channel are generating the most revenue and return-on-ad spend. This report is only available if you use Bing Ads Campaign Analytics.
Budget
What it shows: Your monthly budget, how much you have spent to date, and whether you are on target to spend your monthly budget. Why run it: Your monthly budget, how much you have spent to date, and whether you are on target to spend your monthly budget.
Billing statement
What it shows: Billing documents, including invoices and credit memos. Why run it: To view an overall summary of your billing information.
Create a report expando image
  1. On the Reports page, in the left pane, click Standard reports, and then click either Performance, Change history, Targeting, Campaign analytics, or Billing and budget.
  2. Select the report you want.
  3. Select the Show (unit of time), Date range, download Format and What to report on either all accounts or specific ones.
  4. Click Run to run the report, or Download to download the report as CSV, TSV, or XLSX (Microsoft Excel) file.
Notes
  • Any updates you make to campaigns based on performance report data can take up to a couple of weeks to take effect. So consider running performance reports every two to four weeks.
  • You can regularly run reports either manually using those saved in Reports History, or by scheduling reports to automatically run on a regular basis.
Create a custom report expando image

You can customize a standard report and save it to make it easy to run it again in the future.

  1. On the Reports page, in the left pane, click Standard reports, and then click either Performance, Change history, Targeting, Campaign analytics, or Billing and budget.
  2. Select the report you want.
  3. Select the Show (unit of time), Date range, download Format and What to report on either all accounts or specific ones.
  4. Under Choose your columns, add or remove the columns to set up your report to show what you want.
  5. Optionally, you can select a Filter to apply to your report.
  6. Click My report settings and then select the Save as custom report check box.
  7. Click Run.
  8. In the left pane, click Custom reports and you will see the report you just created. You can click this report anytime to run the report again.
Set up a regularly scheduled report expando image
  1. On the Reports page, in the left pane, click Standard reports, and then click either Performance, Change history, Targeting, Campaign analytics, or Billing and budget.
  2. Select the report you want.
  3. Select the Show (unit of time), Date range, download Format and What to report on either all accounts or specific ones.
  4. Click My report settings and then select the Schedule this report check box.
  5. Select the frequency, day of the week, time of day, start date, and end date for the scheduled report.
  6. Enter the email address where you want the report sent to, and indicate if you want the report sent as an email attachment.
  7. Click Run.
Cancel a scheduled report expando image
  1. In the left pane, click Custom reports.
  2. Select the report you want to delete and then click Delete.

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